It’s All About the Why

Why do you want to lose weight? Is it to fit into your skinny jeans or because you want to feel lighter?

Why are you trying to quit eating French fries? Is it to cut carbs or because fried food makes you feel like crap?

Why are you doing cardio three times a week? To burn calories or to get the amazing endorphin high that stays with you all day?

Why are you doing any of this? Is it to look good or to feel good?

Look, I know you want to lose weight so you can look better. There’s nothing wrong with that, and I get it. But your why has to go beyond what you look like, or you’ll stay stuck. The wrong why makes it almost impossible to achieve your goal, but the right why will get you there . . . and then some.

That’s because the wrong why — trying to lose weight to look good — pushes you to diet. Dieting prevents you from losing weight, and here’s why.

1. You get close and pull back. If your goal is a number, you’ll never cross the finish line. Dieting is miserable, so as soon as you start to see results, you say “Now I can quit and go back to what I was doing.” You’ll start overeating again and eating the unhealthy food you (currently) prefer. You’ll get close, stop working so hard, “fail,” and find another diet to go on.

2. You have to use willpower. Dieting requires willpower, and willpower runs out. Being desperate to lose weight pushes you to extreme behaviors that require massive amounts of willpower, and when it runs out you give up and binge. Plus, it’s always easier to do something than to try not to do something. Working toward being healthy and feeling good is easy. Dieting to lose weight because you hate what you’re looking at all day is not.

3. You never change your habits. You don’t learn anything when you diet. You only address the surface of the problem rather than get to the root of it. You force yourself not to do things you usually do without getting to the reasons you do them in the first place. When you stop focusing on what you look like and start focusing on what you feel like, you’re nicer to yourself. And this allows you to understand why you have the habits you do — instead of hating yourself for having them. That’s the only way you can change them.

The easiest way to switch to a bigger why is to go from gaining a short-term benefit (losing weight) to avoiding a long-term painful consequence (failing over and over again and feeling like crap about yourself). You want to make it easy to stop doing what’s not working.

Think of something you would never do because you know the outcome isn’t worth it. For example, binge watching Netflix all day is for sure more appealing than doing laundry, cleaning your house, and going to the grocery store. But you wouldn’t do that because it’s not worth it when your kids get home from school and you have to do all that and deal with them too.

You have to find a better why than not eating sweets so you can lose ten pounds so you won’t look fat in your bathing suit. Then all you’ll be desperate to do is go on the Whole30, which is extremely difficult. (For most of us, anyway.)

However, if you think about how you crash after eating a ton of candy and feel gross and tired, it’s easier to stop doing it so much and eventually quit altogether. Meaning, you change a habit.

It’s counterintuitive, but you need to engage in a bad habit — but only for a while, so you can see how it makes you feel. Then you realize how it’s really not worth it to have this particular habit, which makes it easier to change it.

You have to have a bigger and better why, because that’s the key to breaking through. Wanting to be skinny means hating your body and dieting to beat it into submission. Wanting to feel better and be healthy means changing your habits, making real progress, and having an exciting and fulfilling life — which means you’ll automatically lose weight. And you’ll look good too. 😉

One thought on “It’s All About the Why

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s